7 Must-Know Facts about Bloodborne Pathogens

Introduction

Bloodborne pathogens are microorganisms such as viruses and bacteria that are present in human blood and can cause disease in humans. Bloodborne pathogens can be transmitted to humans by contact with another person's blood or other body fluids or through exposure to the infected individual's open wound. Bloodborne pathogens are not limited to those diseases caused by HIV. They include many types of viruses, such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV); certain parasites such as malaria, as well as bacterial infections like tetanus and syphilis. Exposure to blood or other body fluids containing the virus may occur when the virus is outside the body (like during an injection) or from inside the body (like through mucous membranes). Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver caused by infection with viruses including HBV and HCV. It is usually transmitted through exposure to blood or other body fluids that contain infectious material from an infected person/s

Bloodborne pathogens are microorganisms 

Bloodborne pathogens are microorganisms such as viruses and bacteria that are present in human blood and can cause disease in humans. They are transmitted through contact with blood or other body fluids, usually during healthcare procedures. They can be transmitted from an infected person to another individual through exposure to the infected person's open wound, by contact with contaminated equipment or instruments used on patients, or by sharing drug preparation equipment (e.g., syringes).

Bloodborne pathogens can be transmitted 

Bloodborne pathogens can be transmitted to humans by contact with another person's blood or other body fluids, or through exposure to the infected individual's open wound. The infected person is infectious before symptoms appear and may not know they are infected.

Bloodborne pathogens can also be transmitted from an infected mother to her baby during pregnancy, delivery or breastfeeding (exposure of the infant through its mother's milk). If you work with a pregnant woman who has been exposed as described above, it is important that you follow these guidelines:

The ways for a person to become infected with a bloodborne pathogen

There are three major ways for a person to become infected with a bloodborne pathogen: being stuck with contaminated needles, having unprotected sexual contact with an infected person or coming into contact with an open wound from an infected person.

Infection Through Needles

The most obvious way to contract any type of infection is through direct contact with another person's bodily fluids. In the case of bloodborne pathogens, this means getting pricked by a needle that has been used by someone who was infected at some point before you or someone else who then used it again later on (either accidentally or intentionally).

Infection Through Sexual Contact

Sexual activity can put you at risk for contracting HIV/AIDS if your partner has HIV/AIDS and does not have safe sex practices or uses condoms regularly during intercourse. Even if both partners are monogamous, there is still risk involved because neither of them knows their partner's sexual history fully nor do they know if he/she uses protection all the time during intercourse.

Exposure to blood or other body fluids

Exposure to blood or other body fluids containing the virus may occur when the virus is outside the body (like during an injection) or from inside the body (like through mucous membranes).


The most common mode of transmission is through percutaneous exposure, which occurs when a sharp object pierces your skin and contaminates it with infected blood. For example, if you were cut by a contaminated needle or if you had a needle stick injury at work, this could expose you to bloodborne pathogens like HIV and hepatitis B.

    Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver

    Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver caused by infection with viruses including HBV and HCV. It's usually transmitted through exposure to blood or other body fluids that contain infectious material from an infected person/s.

    • Hepatitis A: The virus causes acute illness lasting a few weeks, but it can lead to death in some people who are immunocompromised (have severely weakened immune systems). Symptoms include fever, fatigue and abdominal pain; jaundice may also occur later in the course of infection.
    • Hepatitis B: This virus attacks both adults and children; symptoms can include yellowing skin or eyes (jaundice), dark urine, nausea/vomiting and abdominal discomfort; chronic hepatitis B can lead to liver cancer or cirrhosis (scarring) over time if left untreated.* Hepatitis C: This type affects mostly adults aged 30-50 years old; symptoms include fatigue accompanied by joint aches & pains along with weight loss/loss of appetite & nausea/vomiting when first infected but then improve over time so they're often overlooked until later stages where they become more severe such as vomiting blood due to internal bleeding within organs like livers & kidneys resulting from excessive scarring caused by ongoing damage done by toxins produced during cell replication process called mitosis which occurs throughout life span--especially when stressed out due t o lack sufficient restful sleep due t o busy schedules full o f responsibilities we take on voluntarily without realizing how long term effects could impact us negatively later down road if we don't manage our stress levels properly!

    Takeaway:

    • Bloodborne pathogens are microorganisms that cause disease.
    • There are many different types of bloodborne pathogens, including viruses, bacteria and parasites.

    These organisms can be transmitted through exposure to infected blood or body fluids. This includes coming into contact with an open wound on a person who is infected with a pathogen; receiving a vaccination injection from someone who is not wearing gloves; being stuck by a needle used for injections at home or work (e.g., if you're self-injecting insulin); or being cut while performing medical procedures such as drawing blood samples or giving shots without using proper safety equipment like gloves and masks first.* While most people don't have access to these items regularly enough for their own protection against getting sick from them every time they come into contact with an open wound on another person's body (such as when helping an elderly relative), there are steps you can take right now so that they're always available when needed!

      Conclusion

      Bloodborne pathogens are microorganisms such as viruses and bacteria that are present in human blood and can cause disease in humans. Bloodborne pathogens can be transmitted to humans by contact with another person's blood or other body fluids or through exposure to the infected individual's open wound. Exposure to blood or other body fluids containing the virus may occur when the virus is outside the body (like during an injection) or from inside the body (like through mucous membranes). Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver caused by infection with viruses including HBV and HCV. It is usually transmitted through exposure to blood or other body fluids that contain infectious material from an infected person/s

      Bloodborne Pathogen Certifications

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