Bloodborne Pathogens: Minimizing Risk through Certification

Bloodborne pathogens are infectious materials present in human blood. The most common bloodborne pathogen found in hospitals is hepatitis B virus (HBV). They reported that as of 2010, there were about 10,000 cases of HBV each year among healthcare workers. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is another common germs spread by contact with blood. According to the, there are about 2.7 million people living in the U.S. with HCV infections and more than half of them don't know it. They also report that half of the HCV-positive patients were infected through injection drug use or medical procedures before 1992 when blood was not screened for hepatitis C antibodies. In order to reduce the risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens, it is important for healthcare professionals to take care during procedures such as drawing blood and administering injections."

Bloodborne pathogens are infectious materials present in human blood.

Bloodborne pathogens are infectious materials present in human blood. The most common bloodborne pathogens found in hospitals are hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). HBV can be transmitted through contact with infected blood or other bodily fluids, such as semen or vaginal secretions. HCV is also spread via these same routes, but unlike HBV it can also be transmitted through injection drug use or medical procedures before 1992 when sterile equipment was used during surgery and endoscopy procedures like colonoscopies.[1]

In order to reduce the risk of exposure, healthcare professionals must take care during procedures like drawing blood and administering injections.[2]

The most common bloodborne pathogen found in hospitals is hepatitis B virus (HBV).

The most common bloodborne pathogen found in hospitals is hepatitis B virus (HBV). It is transmitted through contact with infected blood or body fluids. HBV can cause serious liver damage and even death. Healthcare workers are at risk of contracting and transmitting HBV if they are exposed to the virus while caring for patients who have it. The best way to prevent infection is by getting vaccinated against HBV before starting work as a healthcare worker and following strict safety procedures when treating patients who may have this disease.

Another common bloodborne pathogen that you may encounter as a nurse or doctor is the hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV causes chronic liver disease including cirrhosis, which leads to permanent scarring of your liver tissue over time. It's not as common as HBV, but it can be more serious when contracted because there's no cure yet available for HCV infection; treatment focuses on managing symptoms until one becomes available through research efforts underway across many organizations worldwide including yours!

They reported that as of 2010, there were about 10,000 cases of HBV each year among healthcare workers.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention () reported that as of 2010, there were about 10,000 cases of HBV each year among healthcare workers. They also noted that more than half of HCV-positive patients were infected through injection drug use or medical procedures before 1992 when blood was not screened for hepatitis C antibodies.

According to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services' National Institutes of Health, there are about 2.7 million Americans living with HCV infections and more than half don't know it!

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is another common germs spread by contact with blood.

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is another common germs spread by contact with blood. HCV is a bloodborne pathogen that causes chronic infections in the liver, and it can be transmitted through the bloodstream, sexual contact, childbirth, injection drug use, or contaminated needles and syringes(1).

Hepatitis C can cause inflammation, swelling, and scarring of the liver(2). It also increases your risk of developing liver failure or cancer of the liver(3).

According to the, there are about 2.7 million people living in the U.S. with HCV infections and more than half of them don't know it. (1)

If you've been exposed to HCV, your risk of infection is higher if:

  • You have a needle stick injury from an infected person's blood or body fluids
  • You are engaging in high-risk sexual behaviors (for example, having unprotected sex with multiple partners)

HCV can be transmitted through blood or other body fluids such as semen and vaginal secretions. It can also be spread through sexual contact; sharing needles; and childbirth. This means that if you have a partner who has been diagnosed with hepatitis C, they may be at risk for transmitting the virus to others as well as themselves.

They also report that half of HCV-positive patients were infected through injection drug use or medical procedures before 1992 when blood was not screened for hepatitis C antibodies. (1)

They also report that half of HCV-positive patients were infected through injection drug use or medical procedures before 1992 when blood was not screened for hepatitis C antibodies.(1)

Hepatitis C is a serious infection that can lead to liver damage, liver failure, and death. Over 2.7 million Americans are living with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.(2)

In order to reduce the risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens, it is important for healthcare professionals to take care during procedures such as drawing blood and administering injections.

  • Wear gloves.
  • Wash hands thoroughly before and after each procedure, and use hand sanitizer if you do not have access to soap and water.
  • Use a new needle for each patient. Discard needles in a sharps container. Wear a mask if splashing is likely:
  • Change gloves if you come into contact with other body fluids:
  • Disinfect instruments between uses:
  • Use a fresh pair of gloves after removing contaminated ones

Conclusion

In order to reduce the risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens, it is important for healthcare professionals to take care during procedures such as drawing blood and administering injections.

BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS CERTIFICATION

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