Bloodborne Pathogens: Why Certification is Essential

As a certified healthcare worker, you're required to know about bloodborne pathogens. These can be found in the human body, in contaminated needles, and other sharp objects. It's easy to become infected with bloodborne pathogens; they can enter your body through an open wound or through mucous membranes.

As a certified healthcare worker, you're required to know about bloodborne pathogens.

As a certified healthcare worker, you're required to know about bloodborne pathogens. You need to understand the risks of exposure and how it can be prevented. You need to know how to protect yourself from bloodborne pathogens as well as your patients and others in the environment around you.

Bloodborne pathogens can be found in the human body, in contaminated needles, and other sharp objects.

Bloodborne pathogens can be found in the human body, in contaminated needles, and other sharp objects. For example:

  • Hepatitis B is a viral disease that causes inflammation of the liver. It's transmitted through contact with infected blood or body fluids such as semen, vaginal secretions, and saliva.
  • HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) attacks your immune system and makes it difficult for your body to fight off infections or illnesses. It spreads through infected blood, semen, and other bodily fluids like vaginal secretions or saliva that come into contact with an open wound on your skin (like a needle stick) or mucous membranes such as those inside the mouth or nose

It's easy to become infected with bloodborne pathogens; they can enter your body through an open wound or through mucous membranes.

Bloodborne pathogens are viruses and bacteria that can be transmitted through blood or other body fluids. They can enter your body through an open wound, such as a cut or scrape; through mucous membranes, such as the lining of the nose or mouth; through broken skin on your hands, arms, or face; or even through your eyes.

Hepatitis B is caused by exposure to the hepatitis B virus (HBV).

Hepatitis B is a viral infection that affects the liver. It's caused by exposure to the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Most people with HBV don't know they're infected, because they don't have symptoms or signs of illness.

Hepatitis B can be transmitted through contact with infected blood or other body fluids such as semen, vaginal secretions, and saliva. The risk of getting hepatitis B increases if you:

  • Share needles with someone who has hepatitis B;
  • Have multiple sex partners without using protection;
  • Live with someone who has chronic hepatitis B infection (this includes family members);
  • Are born to an infected mother during childbirth or breastfeeding;

Hepatitis C is caused by exposure to the hepatitis C virus (HCV).

Hepatitis C is caused by exposure to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It can be transmitted via blood and other bodily fluids.

It can cause chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and liver cancer.

AIDS is caused by exposure to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

HIV is a virus that attacks the immune system. It can be transmitted by contact with infected blood or bodily fluids, such as semen during sexual intercourse, vaginal fluids during birth, and breast milk from an HIV-infected mother. HIV can also be transmitted through shared needles used for injecting drugs and tattooing; it's not possible to catch HIV from casual contact with someone who has it (such as shaking hands).

The most common way people become infected with HIV is through sex without using protection (condoms). However, there have been cases where people were infected through oral sex or anal sex when one partner had cuts on his/her mouth or anus which could have allowed transmission of blood into those areas. Some studies show that unprotected sex between men who have sex with men accounts for about half of the new infections each year in some countries such as the United States and France but this varies widely by country depending on cultural attitudes towards homosexuality among other factors so it's difficult to know exactly how much risk there is involved when engaging in sexual activity without using protection against STDs like syphilis or gonorrhea which may also exist among gay couples who engage in anal intercourse but do not use condoms due to fear of pregnancy rather than concern over contracting STDs themselves

Any employee who comes into contact with blood, bodily fluids or other potentially infectious materials is at risk of infection.

Employees must follow safety protocols, be trained in how to avoid exposure, and report exposure. They must also be trained in how to use personal protective equipment (PPE), clean up spills, and more. Bloodborne pathogens can also be transmitted through contact with contaminated environments or equipment, such as razors or needles.

Employers who require employees with occupational exposure risk factors to wear PPE must provide them with the appropriate PPE at no cost. The employer must ensure that:

  • Employees know how to properly put on, secure, and remove PPE;
  • Employers give employees frequent opportunities for training on the proper use of PPE;
  • Employers ensure that all workers receive training before the initial assignment;

In order for a disease diagnosis to be made, it must be confirmed by a healthcare professional or laboratory test.

In order for a disease diagnosis to be made, it must be confirmed by a healthcare professional or laboratory test. A physical examination and blood tests are usually performed first. If these tests don't confirm the diagnosis, then more invasive procedures may be needed like urine testing and cultures (in which bacteria grow in liquid). Some diseases can be treated if they are diagnosed early enough.

Employees must take precautions against exposure to bloodborne pathogens and follow safety protocols set forth in regulations.

Employees must take precautions against exposure to bloodborne pathogens and follow safety protocols set forth in regulations. Employees must be trained in the proper methods of handling bloodborne pathogens, as well as how to protect themselves from such exposure.

Employees are required by law to follow the safety protocols set forth by their employer. If they do not adhere to these regulations, they could be subject to disciplinary action or termination

Conclusion

Bloodborne pathogens are a serious risk for healthcare workers, and they can spread quickly if proper precautions aren't taken. If you're looking for a way to protect yourself against infection, consider getting certified as a Bloodborne Pathogens Specialist.

BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS CERTIFICATION

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