CPR Techniques: An In-depth Look

CPR Techniques: An In-depth Look

Introduction

CPR is an essential skill that every adult should know. CPR is a mix of rescue breathing and chest compressions. If you see someone who isn't breathing or has no pulse, call 911 first, then do CPR by pushing hard and fast on the victim's chest about 100 times per minute until help arrives—if possible!

A mix of rescue breathing and chest compressions.

CPR is a mix of rescue breathing and chest compressions. People describe CPR as a combination of rescue breathing. This involves giving someone oxygen through mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, and chest compressions. In other words, pressing hard and fast on the center of the chest 100 times per minute (or faster) until help arrives.

You can do CPR on an adult who isn't breathing or has no pulse--call 911 first, then begin to perform CPR by following these steps:

  • Call 911 immediately; this step is critical because you need medical professionals to come to help you with your efforts. If there's anything wrong with your patient's heart rhythm or lungs that might require advanced care beyond what you can provide on your own.

Call 911 first, then do CPR.

If you see someone who isn't breathing or has no pulse, call 911 first, then do CPR.

Do not start CPR if it is not safe to do so.

Do not start CPR if you are not confident that you can perform it properly and without causing harm to yourself or others. If there is another person present with the skills necessary for performing chest compressions (e.g., a doctor), let them handle this task. Never attempt something yourself that could cause harm in an emergency situation where seconds count! Be sure when you begin compression, that there isn't any other way to help the victim (e.g., open airway).

. Lay your patient on their back, and check for signs of life. If necessary, roll them onto their side so that they can cough up any fluids or food that may have gotten into their lungs.

You can also do CPR on a baby or child.

You can also do CPR on a baby or child.

If you're unsure, call 911 first. It's important to know how CPR is done on babies because they have smaller bodies than adults do,

If your patient is conscious and responsive, ask him/her if he/she is OK and tell him what happened (i.e., that he/she fell).

If there is another person present with the skills necessary for performing chest compressions (e.g., a doctor), let them handle this task instead of attempting something yourself. This could cause harm in an emergency situation where seconds count! Be sure when you begin compression, that there isn't any other way to help the victim (e.g., open airway).

Get the okay.

  • If your patient is conscious, ask them if they're OK and tell them what you're doing before you start CPR.
  • If they say they are OK or that they don't need help, then stop.
  • If the person doesn't respond or is unresponsive (like if they've lost consciousness), continue with CPR until help arrives or their condition improves enough for you to stop without hurting them more than necessary.

If your patient is unconscious, check to see if he/she is breathing by placing your ear over his/her mouth and nose. If you can hear or feel any breaths, then call 911 immediately and start CPR.

CPR may help restart with the heart.

However, it's worth noting that CPR is only a temporary solution until help arrives. It's not a substitute for professional medical care and should only be performed by trained individuals who are able to assess the situation first.

Chest compressions

When giving chest compressions, push hard and fast with all the force your arms can muster 1/3 of the way down on the chest wall (between nipples), then release completely before pushing again--do this at least 100 times per minute until help arrives, if possible.

  • Push hard enough to depress at least 2 inches (5 cm) of soft tissue under normal circumstances or 4 inches (10 cm) in infants and children. 
  • Push straight down rather than toward yourself. 

Any amount of help is better than nothing at all!

Don't feel bad if you don't perform CPR as well as you could have--people have been trained for years to perform this skill properly, so just remember that any amount of help is better than nothing at all!

  • Do not worry about doing it perfectly. The most important thing is knowing what to do in an emergency situation and being comfortable enough with the process so that when someone needs help, they can count on you.
  • Make sure that when performing chest compressions on an adult victim (one who is age 18 or older). Only use one hand at a time; otherwise, it may compromise circulation and cause additional injury to the victim's heart muscle tissue. Use two fingers from each hand together with moderate pressure in order for them not only to receive adequate blood flow but also to maintain proper rhythm throughout their chest cavity. 
  • Practice makes perfect. When learning new skills or trying something new for the first time. It takes some time out beforehand so that when faced with real-life circumstances later down the line there won't be any surprises regarding unfamiliar tasks being thrown into the mix unexpectedly."

Conclusion

CPR is a mix of rescue breathing and chest compressions. If you see someone who isn't breathing or has no pulse, call 911 first, then do CPR. You can also do CPR on a baby or child. If your patient is conscious, ask them if they're OK and tell them what you're doing before you start CPR.

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