First Aid for Dogs: What to Do in a Canine Seizure

Introduction

Seizures can be scary and difficult to watch, especially if you don't know what to expect or how to help. If your dog has never had a seizure before, the first time you witness one is likely to be even more frightening. These episodes of abnormal brain activity occur because of an imbalance in chemicals within the brain which causes neurons (nerve cells) to fire uncontrollably. A seizure can last anywhere from a few seconds up to several minutes—but it may not stop there! The first thing you should do is make sure your dog isn’t hurt after having a seizure; this includes checking for any potential injuries like cuts or bruises on their face, head, or body just in case they fell off something during the episode. If your dog isn't injured but still having seizures every hour or less than five minutes apart from each other then call your vet immediately as they may need emergency care by either themself or through treatment with medication prescribed by their veterinarian

What to do if your dog has a seizure

  • Don't panic. Seizures are not a death sentence, and most dogs will recover just fine if you follow the instructions below.
  • Do not try to hold down or restrain your dog during a seizure. He will not bite you, so don't worry about that aspect of it--but if he jerks around enough, he could hurt himself or break something (like a tooth).
  • Do not put anything in your dog's mouth while he is having a seizure; this includes water bottles, toys, and food bowls. It's best to just let him have his seizure without interference from human hands until it passes completely on its own (about 15 minutes).

The first thing to do is make sure the seizure is not caused by something else

The first thing to do is make sure the seizure is not caused by something else, such as low blood sugar or an overdose of medication. If you suspect a drug reaction or illness, take your dog to the vet right away.

If this is your first time seeing a canine seizure, it can be difficult to recognize what's happening. With some practice, however:

  • Recognize when a dog has epilepsy (a disorder characterized by recurring seizures).
  • Watch for symptoms that indicate an overdose of medication--for example, if you administer pills yourself and forget how much your pet received earlier in the day because you were distracted by other things going on at home such as kids coming home from school early due to inclement weather conditions outside...

If the seizure lasts longer than 5 minutes, your dog may need emergency care 

If a seizure lasts longer than five minutes, your pet may need emergency care by a veterinarian or veterinarian technician. If the seizure is less than five minutes and there are no lasting effects, try to keep track of how long they last and how many in an hour.

If you're not sure what time to call us, we recommend calling between 9 am-5 pm Monday-Friday (excluding holidays) at (888) 880-6287 for assistance with any questions about first aid for dogs during seizures.

If it's safe to do so while your dog is having a seizure

If it's safe to do so while your dog is having a seizure, place him on his side with his head between his legs to help keep him from biting his tongue or getting any other injuries. A seizure can be frightening for people who have never experienced one before, but it's important not to panic and try to stop the seizure by shaking or slapping your dog in the face. This can cause further injury and make matters worse.

You should also keep an eye out for signs of poisoning if you think that might be what caused the seizure: these include vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy (a lack of energy), loss of appetite, and incoordination--but these symptoms may also indicate other conditions like epilepsy or meningitis (inflammation of the meninges).

Keep track of how long the seizure lasts and how many there are in an hour.

It's important to keep track of how long the seizure lasts and how many there are in an hour. This information can be useful for your veterinarian, who can use it to help determine the cause of your dog's seizures.

To do this, you'll need a stopwatch or app on your phone that counts seconds and minutes (and possibly even milliseconds). If you don't have one yet, get one! It will be very helpful when trying to figure out how long each episode lasts.

Recognize canine epilepsy when it happens.

If you see a dog having a seizure, it's important to know that this is not normal behavior for the animal. Seizures can be caused by epilepsy, but they may also be caused by other conditions such as brain tumors or poisoning. If your pet has had one or more seizures in the past and has been diagnosed with epilepsy, then you will want to take them to their regular veterinarian for treatment. If this is not the case, then it's best just to contact your local emergency vet clinic so they can assess your dog's condition and make sure he isn't suffering from anything serious.

If you witness a dog having a seizure, try to get them into a safe space

If you witness a dog having a seizure, try to get them into a safe space where they can't hurt themselves and make sure someone else knows about it. Try not to panic yourself; seizures are scary but they're also relatively common in dogs. If you can't get the dog somewhere safe, try getting someone else's help in handling the situation.

If your pet has had one seizure already and seems fine after it ends (they may be disoriented or confused), then there's likely no need for further intervention unless they have another episode within an hour or so of their first one--in which case you should contact your vet right away!

Conclusion

If you witness a dog having a seizure, try to get them into a safe space where they can't hurt themselves and make sure someone else knows about it. If the first aid techniques above don't work for your dog, then call your local veterinarian or animal hospital immediately so that they can help.

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