The Life-Saving Power of CPR Certification

Introduction

Cardiac arrest is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the heart's electrical activity becomes disrupted. A person experiencing cardiac arrest will lose consciousness and become unresponsive, which means they're not breathing on their own. Cardiac arrest can cause death within minutes if CPR isn't administered immediately. If someone you know has stopped breathing or gone into cardiac arrest, it's important to call 911 and begin administering CPR until EMTs arrive at the scene with a defibrillator unit. It is estimated that every year in the U.S., 30% of cardiac arrest victims die before reaching emergency medical services—but that doesn't have to happen if you learn how to perform basic CPR skills!

30% of cardiac arrest victims die before reaching emergency medical services.

30% of cardiac arrest victims die before reaching emergency medical services. That's why it's so important for everyone to know how to administer CPR--the sooner you start, the better your chances are at saving a life.

About 10% of people who suffer from cardiac arrest are saved by bystanders who administer CPR before EMTs arrive on the scene or paramedics take over treatment after arriving at the scene. Many employers require employees to go through annual CPR training so that they'll be prepared if an emergency occurs on their property or during work hours

Cardiac arrest.

Cardiac arrest is the sudden loss of heart function, and it can occur when the electrical impulses that coordinate contractions between the heart's upper and lower parts become disrupted.

When cardiac arrest occurs, the body needs oxygen to survive. But without a beating heart, oxygen does not reach your brain or other vital organs and you will die within minutes if help isn't given immediately. Bystanders who perform CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) on an unconscious person with cardiac arrest have been shown to increase their odds of survival by up to 50%.

During cardiac arrest, blood stops flowing to vital organs in your body, which can cause death within minutes.

When someone suffers cardiac arrest, the heart stops beating and blood stops flowing to vital organs in the body. Without immediate attention, this can cause death within minutes if CPR isn't administered immediately.

To perform CPR on an adult:

  • Call 911 first; then check for signs of life such as breathing or a pulse on both sides of the neck (carotid arteries). If there are none, begin performing chest compressions immediately.
  • Position yourself between the victim's shoulders so that you can reach both sides of his/her chest easily with one hand. Place two fingers on top of one another over his/her breastbone (sternum) with one hand while using your other hand to support and guide it into place without breaking rhythm during compressions.
  • Press down firmly--about 2 inches deep--and fast at least 100 times per minute until help arrives.
  • After 30 compressions give two breaths into his/her mouth by pinching shut his/her nose, tilting their head back slightly, and blowing air into their lungs until they resume breathing normally on their own

Basic CPR skills.

Basic CPR skills include chest compressions and artificial respiration, which help circulate oxygenated blood throughout the body until a defibrillator can be used to restart a fibrillating heart. Chest compressions are performed on the chest, at a rate of 100-120 per minute. The compression depth should be at least 2 inches (5 cm), with each compression lasting about 1 second. The rate of compressions is the same as your heartbeat rate (60-100 beats per minute).

CPR is most effective when given within 2 minutes after cardiac arrest occurs; however, it may still be useful up to 8 minutes after cardiac arrest if you don't have access to an automated external defibrillator (AED).

Every minute without CPR reduces your chance of survival by 10%.

Every minute without CPR reduces your chance of survival by 10%. The longer you wait, the less likely it is that the person will survive.

A basic cardiac arrest scenario should be treated with immediate chest compressions plus rescue breaths. This means performing 30 compressions at a rate of 100-120 per minute (30:100), followed by 2 breaths with an oxygen mask or bag valve mask (2:1). This can be repeated until help arrives or you become exhausted and must stop due to fatigue or pain in your arms or shoulders.

In general terms, this translates into about 5 minutes total time spent doing chest compressions before moving onto rescue breathing cycles every minute thereafter until help arrives.

Many employers require employees to go through annual CPR training.

If you're looking for a way to help others in your community, becoming certified in CPR is an excellent choice. There are many ways that you can do this. The first step is finding a class near you and signing up for it. You can find all the information about these classes on.

If you know how to perform CPR on someone whose heart has stopped beating, then you could save their life someday!

If you know how to perform CPR on someone whose heart has stopped beating, then you could save their life someday!

  • You can save a life by knowing how to perform CPR.
  • CPR certification is something that anyone can learn in a short class.
  • It's something that anyone can do at any time or place. Even if there isn't an AED nearby, you may still be able to help someone who's suffering from cardiac arrest by using manual chest compressions until paramedics arrive with their equipment or another bystander arrives with theirs (as long as it isn't damaged). And once certified, this skill will stay with you forever--so there's no need for repeated training sessions throughout your life!

Conclusion

CPR certification is a valuable skill to have, and it could save someone's life someday. If you know how to perform CPR on someone whose heart has stopped beating, then you could save their life someday!

CPR/AED Certification

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