What Are Grade I, II, and III Burns?

Today, we are going to learn more about these burns. This article will help you understand the causes and types of these burns. Continue reading to be aware of this crucial knowledge you can use to help yourself and others.

What are Burns?

The meaning of the term ‘burn’ is not restricted to the burning sensation associated with this injury. They are characterized by severe skin damage where the affected skin cells die. Depending on the degree and cause of injury, the majority of people recover from burns without severe health consequences. But in case of more serious burns, immediate emergency medical care is required to prevent complications and death. Minor burns take several days to heal completely, whereas more serious burns take months to recover from. In addition, there is a greater risk of infection  when your skin gets damaged by a burn.

Causes of Burns

While open flames are one of the most common reasons for burns, they usually result from an energy transfer to the body. The causes of burns are classified as follows.

  1. Thermal Burns

When you touch a very hot object, it raises the temperature of your skin, and your skin cells start dying. The reasons for thermal burns include flames, very hot metals, scalding liquids, and steam.

  1. Chemical Burns

When the chemicals such as strong acids, solvents, and detergents come in contact with your skin, they can cause your skin to burn.

  1. Radiation Burns

Sunburn is a typical example of radiation burn, while the other sources of radiation that can cause burn are X-rays or radiation therapy to treat cancer.

  1. Electrical Burns

This type of burn is possible when you come into contact with an electrical current.

  1. Cold Burns

These types of burns are also called ‘frostbite,’ which causes damage to the skin by freezing it. Being outside in freezing temperatures can cause frostbite. If your skin gets in contact with something very cold directly for a prolonged period of time, it can cause a cold burn.

  1. Friction Burns

When some of your skin gets rubbed off by a hard object, a friction burn is what you have. It’s both a heat burn and an abrasion (scrape). These burns are commonly observed in motorcycle and bike accidents.

Stages or Grades of Burns

Burns are classified as Grade-I, II, and III, depending on severity and depth of skin penetration.

  • Grade-I (Superficial) Burns

Also known as first-degree burns, they affect only the epidermis, i.e., the outer layer of your skin. There are no blisters at the burn site; they are red, painful, and dry. An example is a mild sunburn. These burns rarely cause long-term tissue damage and often consist of an increase or decrease in your skin color.

  • Grade-II (Partial Thickness) Burns

These are second-degree burns involving the epidermis and a part of the dermis layer of your skin. The burn site usually appears red and blistered. It may be swollen and painful in some cases.

  • Grade-III (Full Thickness) Burns

Also called third-degree burns, they destroy the epidermis and dermis layers of your skin. These burns can also damage your muscles, tendons, and underlying bones. The burn site usually appears white or charred. Due to the destroyed nerve endings, there is no sensation in the burnt area.

If a child’s body is affected 10 percent and an adult’s body is affected 15 to 20 percent by a burn, it is considered a major injury. There is a strong need for hospitalization and extensive rehabilitation.

Understanding the risk of burns and injuries in our day-to-day life is quite important. However, you must also be knowledgeable and skilled in administering first aid in such conditions. If you want to get certified in first aid, you can visit us at MyCPR NOW.

What Are Grade I, II, and III Burns?  We all want ourselves and our family members to be safe from injuries and health issues. Especially our kids, who are prone to different types of injuries, and hence they need more care. Among those common injuries, burns are common household injuries we observe more in the case of kids and sometimes adults as well.  Today, we are going to learn more about these burns. This article will help you understand the causes and types of these burns. Continue reading to be aware of this crucial knowledge you can use to help yourself and others.  What are Burns? The meaning of the term ‘burn’ is not restricted to the burning sensation associated with this injury. They are characterized by severe skin damage where the affected skin cells die. Depending on the degree and cause of injury, the majority of people recover from burns without severe health consequences. But in case of more serious burns, immediate emergency medical care is required to prevent complications and death. Minor burns take several days to heal completely, whereas more serious burns take months to recover. In addition, a greater risk of infection is when your skin gets damaged by a burn.  Causes of Burns While open flames are one of the most common reasons for burns, they usually result from an energy transfer to the body. The causes of burns are classified as follows. 1. Thermal Burns When you touch a very hot object, it raises the temperature of your skin, and your skin cells start dying. The reasons for thermal burns include flames, very hot metals, scalding liquids, and steam. 2. Chemical Burns When the chemicals such as strong acids, solvents, and detergents come in contact with your skin, they can cause your skin to burn. 3. Radiation Burns Sunburn is a typical example of radiation burn, while the other sources of radiation that can cause burn are X-rays or radiation therapy to treat cancer. 4. Electrical Burns This type of burn is possible when you come into contact with an electrical current. 5. Cold Burns These types of burns are also called ‘frostbite,’ which causes damage to the skin by freezing it. Being outside in freezing temperatures can cause frostbite. If your skin gets in contact with something very cold directly for a prolonged period of time, it can cause a cold burn. 6. Friction Burns When some of your skin gets rubbed off by a hard object, a friction burn is what you have. It’s both a heat burn and an abrasion (scrape). These burns are commonly observed in motorcycle and bike accidents.  Stages or Grades of Burns Burns are classified as Grade-I, II, and III, depending on how severe and deep they penetrate your skin's surface. • Grade-I (Superficial) Burns Also known as first-degree burns, they affect only the epidermis, i.e., the outer layer of your skin. There are no blisters at the burn site; they are red, painful, and dry. For example, a mild sunburn. These burns rarely cause long-term tissue damage and often consist of an increase or decrease in your skin color. • Grade-II (Partial Thickness) Burns These are also second-degree burns involving the epidermis and a part of the dermis layer of your skin. The burn site usually appears red and blistered. It may be swollen and painful in some cases. • Grade-III (Full Thickness) Burns Also called third-degree burns, they destroy the epidermis and dermis layers of your skin. These burns can also damage your muscles, tendons, and underlying bones. The burn site usually appears white or charred. Due to the destroyed nerve endings, there is no sensation in the burnt area. Suppose a child’s body is affected 10 percent and an adult’s body is affected 15 to 20 percent by a burn. In that case, it is considered a major injury, and there’s a strong need for hospitalization and extensive rehabilitation.  Understanding the risk of burns and injuries in our day-to-day life is quite important. However, you must also be knowledgeable and skilled in administering first aid in such conditions. If you want to get certified in first aid, you can visit us at MyCPR NOW.
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